Syllabus

English 9

Ms. Schuch

 

The newly-developed high school English curriculum enables students to focus on specific dispositions and essential questions unique to each grade level.  For the purpose of English 9, students will fully examine a variety of texts addressing the idea of Inter-Relationships and Self-Reliance in relation to families, communities, societies, governments, and economics. 

 

In order to succeed in this class, students will examine a variety of universal themes and big ideas, and be asked a number of essential questions that involve self-examination and reflection:

 

  • Who am I?
  • How do my skills and talents help to define me?
  • How do I relate to my family, my community, and my society?
  • How do I build networks of people to support me?
  • How am I a reflection of my relationships?
  • How do my relationships within and across groups affect others?
  • What influence do class, religion, language, and culture have on my relationships and my decisions?
  • What can I contribute as an individual?
  • What is my responsibility to society?
  • How do I see my beliefs reflected in government policies and by politicians?

     

    In each marking period, students will examine a particular universal theme and big idea by reading an anchor text.  Each anchor text will be accompanied by multiple linking texts that will include novels, short stories, poems, nonfiction pieces, articles, and movies.  The goal is to give students the tools to make connections across texts in accordance with essential questions and universal themes.

     

    Within each anchor text unit of study, students will be asked to develop answers to essential questions.  A variety of reading, listening, viewing, writing, speaking, and expressing strategies and activities will be assigned in order to accomplish this task. 

     

     

     

     

     

    Syllabus

    English 9

    Ms. Schuch

     

     

    Reading Expectations:

  • View self as a competent reader capable of comprehending text
  • read daily
  • determine purpose for reading
  • use metacognition and a variety of strategies to self-monitor and overcome difficulties with reading and after reading
  • respond to a variety of texts individually and collaboratively

     

    Writing Expectations:

  • write daily
  • ·view writing as an ongoing process
  • write to facilitate and demonstrate learning
  • use a variety of process writing strategies independently and in groups
  • share and submit polished writing for and intended audience outside the classroom once a semester
  • reflect on own writing to identify strengths and weaknesses, monitor own progress during and after writing, and select best examples of writing.

     

    Speaking/Listening Expectations:

  • listen actively
  • listen responsively and analytically
  • monitor and adjust listening behaviors for a variety of contexts
  • use oral language correctly to communicate
  • engage in discussions

     

    Viewing/Representing Expectations:

  • develop competencies as a viewer
  • comprehend a variety of visual texts for multiple purposes
  • use media to represent knowledge

     

    Technology/Thinking/Life Applications:

  • use a variety of technological media, independently and collaboratively, to communicate and learn
  • integrate and apply literacy skills from a variety of diverse texts

     

     

     

     

     

    Syllabus

    English 9

    Semester #1

    Ms. Schuch

     

    Anchor Text:  The Hero by Ron Woods

  • Theme:                  Heroism

  • Big Ideas:              Responsibility, loyalty, Survival/Personal Struggle

     

    Linking Texts:           

  • “The Odyssey” by Homer

    “The Euphio Question” by Kurt Vonnegut

    “A Trip To the Edge of Survival” by Ron Arias

    “The Scarlet Ibis” by James Hurst

    “The Last Boast” by Dorothy Johnson

    “Lineage” by Margaret Walker

    “The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony” by Margaret Truman

    “Unfinished Business” by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

    Martin Luther King Jr. Speeches (thisibelieve.org)

    Maya Angelou poetry  (poemhunter.com)

    Simon Birch

    Radio

    My Left Foot

    Tuesdays With Morrie

     

    Writing Expectations:

  • write an expository piece on the heroic qualities of a particular character
  • paragraph formation
  • use transition appropriately within and between paragraphs
  • appropriately use quotations for support
  • use standard English grammar
  • use standard punctuation
  • develop higher-level vocabulary
  • cite sources using MLA style
  • use reference tools for improving writing

     

    Reading Expectations:

  • before reading, predict, identify purpose, and use prior knowledge
  • during and after reading, evaluate and identify author’s style
  • identify purpose with and among a variety of texts
  • analyze literary elements
  • identify universal themes in a variety of texts
  • compare theme, character, and events across two or more texts
  • ·organize, analyze, and synthesize information from a variety of texts to investigate a problem and draw conclusions
  • demonstrate an understanding of literary characterization
  • determine the meaning of unfamiliar words

     

    Syllabus

    English 9

    Semester #1

    Ms. Schuch

     

    Anchor Text:  Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

    Theme:                  Choices and Consequences

                                   Relationships Require Responsibility

    Big Ideas:              Relationships, Decisions/Thinking Through Decisions, Diversity, Conflict

     

  • Linking Texts:                   

  • “The Great Taos Bank Robbery” by Tony Hillerman

  • “The Last Boast” by Dorothy Johnson

    “Grover Dill and the Tasmanian Devil” by Jean Shepherd

    “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant

    “American History” by Judith Ortiz Cofer

    “Fish Cheeks” by Amy Tan

    “Annabel Lee” and “Incident in a Rose Garden” poems

     West Side Story

     Tuesdays With Morrie

     

    Writing Expectations:

  • formulate and extend a thesis, argument, or exploration of a topic by analyzing differing perspectives to convey ideas
  • match and arrange paragraph format to appropriate genre
  • appropriately use quotations for support
  • conventions in citing titles
  • parentheses
  • cite sources using MLA style
  • use reference tools for improving writing
  • defend a position
  • resolve inconsistencies in logic, anticipate and address counterclaims

     

    Reading Expectations:

  • apply multiple strategies to comprehend a variety of texts with increased fluency, vocabulary, and independence
  • before reading, identify purpose and what is known and not known about a topic
  • during and after reading, paraphrase and summarize, compare and contrast, identify author’s purpose and tone, understand informational structure
  • analyze the interplay of literary elements and multiple organizational patterns within a given text
  • ·organize, analyze, and synthesize information form a variety of texts to investigate a problem and draw conclusions

     

     

     

    Syllabus

    English 9

    Semester #2

    Ms. Schuch

     

    Anchor Text:  To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

  • Themes: Integrity/Tolerance

    Big Ideas:              Self-Awarenes, Community/Society, Diversity, Racism, Prejudice, Empathy, Understanding, Tolerance

    Linking Texts:                   

  • The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

  • “A&P” by John Updike

    “Marigolds” by Eugenia Collier

    “A Christmas Memory” by Truman Capote                                                                                                                           “The Boy Who Painted Christ Black” by John Henrick Clark                                                                                                    Jim Crow laws

  •  Brown vs. Board of Education

    “Jocks and Prejudice” Kristof editorial

    “Sympathy” and “We Wear the Mask” by Paul Lawrence Dunbar

    “I Have a Dream” speech

     Remember the Titans

     12 Angry Men

     Eyes on the Prize

     

    Writing Expectations:

  • write an original narrative
  • leads, figurative language, sensory detail, narration, dialogue
  • ·variety of sentence structures
  • ·verb tense
  • pronoun agreement
  • commas
  • semicolon
  • elevated vocabulary

     

    Reading Expectations:

  • before reading, predict, identify purpose, and use prior knowledge
  • during and after reading, predict and confirm, infer/draw conclusions, retell in sequence, paraphrase and summarize, understand narrative structure, literary devices
  • identify purpose within and among a variety of texts:  how a section, detail, person, or event relates to a theme of main idea
  • identify universal themes
  • compare theme, character, and events across two or more texts
  • demonstrate an understanding of literary characterization, character development, function of major/minor characters, motives and causes for actions, moral dilemmas

     

    Syllabus

    English 9

    Semester #2

    Ms. Schuch

     

    Anchor Text:       The Other Side of the Sky:  a Memoir by Farah Ahmedi

    Theme:  Diversity

    Big Ideas:  Tolerance, Empathy, Relationships, Personal Responsibilities To Community      

    Linking Texts:                                                              Farewell To Manzanar by Jean Wakasuki

      The Land by Mildred Taylor

     “Fish Cheeks” by Amy Tan

      “The Warriors” by Anna Walters

      “Everybody Knows Tobie” by Daniel Garza

      “Laksmi” by Visanthi Victor                                                                                                                                           Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin                                                                                                                           Black Boy by Richard Wright                                                                                                                                      “Only Daughters” by Sandra Cisneros

  •  “A Trip To the Edge of Survival” by Ron Arias

     “White Privilege:  Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack” by Peggy

           McIntosh

      “Theme For English B” by Langston Hughes

      “Hanging Fire” by Audre Lorde

      “Manzanar” documentary

      “Children of the Camps” documentary (PBS.org)

       America at the Crossroads (PBS.org)

      Challenge Day materials

     

    Writing Expectations:

  • write a multi-genre research project
  • understand and use the English language effectively in a variety of contexts and settings
  • formulate and extend a thesis by analyzing differing perspectives to convey ideas
  • match and arrange paragraph format to appropriate genre
  • use transitions appropriately
  • use citations appropriately
  • use a variety of sentence structures
  • use standard English grammar
  • use standard punctuation
  • cite sources using MLA style
  • defend a position
  • resolve inconsistencies in logic

     

    Reading Expectations:

  • apply multiple strategies to comprehend a variety of texts with increased fluency, sight vocabulary, and independence
  • identify and use multiple strategies independently before, during, and after reading to analyze and understand texts
  • identify purpose with and among a variety of texts
  • analyze the interplay of literary elements and multiple organizational matters within a given text
  • identify universal themes
  • compare theme, character, and events across two or more texts
  • ·organize, analyze, and synthesize information from a variety of texts to investigate a problem and draw conclusions

     


  • Syllabus

    Advanced Placement English

    Welcome to AP English 12!

     

    Course Description/Overview

    The Advanced Placement English course is designed to teach the equivalent of a first year college-level English and writing class and follows the curricular requirements described in the AP English Course Description.  You will read a variety of literary texts, learn important literary and poetic elements, and be expected to master the art of thinking and writing critically by analyzing challenging texts.  Each semester, you will focus on a particular theme that addresses a challenging idea.  Each unit is intended to reflect a specific college-level course.  For example, during the first semester, we will focus on Women’s Literature, Popular Canon Unit, and a Poetry Unit.  In the second semester, a Multicultural Unit and Drama Unit will reflect the particular theme.  Oftentimes, you will read, write, and learn outside of the English Literature realm.  I try to embed as much history and Philosophy into our discussions and reading and writing assignments as possible.

    The reading assignments are challenging and varied according to our particular unit and themes covered.  Be prepared to read a great deal in this class.  But unlike years past, you will learn to analyze what you read, question the important themes, step outside the box to understand other character’s beliefs and actions, and most importantly, challenge yourself to discover your own voice.

    The types of writing in the course are also challenging and require you to utilize your skills at analysis.  You will be expected to write to understand, to explain, and to evaluate.  Oftentimes, you will be expected to develop your own argument or focus of analysis and elaborate and critique an author’s work using both primary sources as well as outside reading example.  Your focus is not necessarily about what happens in the novel, but why and how this event or character reflects the deeper meaning.  All assignments will require you to be analytical.  For example, as you develop your essay, you will be required to ask yourself how this element or scene helps the development of the novel.  The most important element of any essay will be the depth of your paragraph development and ideas.  You will also revise a majority of your essays into polished pieces that you will keep in a writing portfolio in the classroom.  These pieces can be used for reference and/or a college application sample writing piece.

    The most important expectation I have of you is that walk away as better readers, more effective writers, life-long learners with a  greater knowledge, understanding, and love for literature as well as a deeper sense of yourself and your own voice.

    Semester I Theme:    Isolation and Societal Control, Expectations, and Gender Role and Rules

    Topic/Unit:     Introduction to the Course

    A Brief History of the English Language

    (approximately 1 week)

               

    Students will spend the first week reviewing the history of the English language.  Six significant waves of the English Language will be examined (Indo-European and Germanic Influences, Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, Late Modern English, and American English).  Students will work in a group to and present your particular wave to the class at the end of the week.  Your focus should be to identify when and where the language changed, why the language changed, what aspects of the language changed, and offer examples or writers/writings from that period.

    Topic/Unit:     Women’s Literature:  Controlled Environment and Gender Roles

     

     

    Students will be reading a variety of selections that address women’s themes and issues.  The focused theme of love vs. autonomy will be analyzed and applied to secondary texts as well.  Be prepared to read, write, and discuss these texts and the focused theme on a daily basis.   

    Bronte, Charlotte.  Jane Eyre.  Signet Classics; New York, 1982.

    Focused Theme:  Love vs. Autonomy

    (approximately 3 weeks)

    Address/Discuss the following areas:

    Structured Composition:  Write an essay that analyzes either religion or gender roles in Jane Eyre.   Students will establish Jane’s struggle using foil characters, contrast Jane’s beliefs with other character, and reveal Jane’s true beliefs.

    Final Writing Analysis:  Multi-Genre Essay:  Love vs. Autonomy

    What point does the novel make about the position or treatment of women and marriage in Victorian society?  You are to read and incorporate the following selections:

     

    Chopin, Kate.  The Awakening.  Barbara Solomon, ed.  Signet; New York,

    1976.

    Focused Theme:  Fate vs. Free-will, Freedom vs. Restraint

    (approximately 3 weeks)

    Address/Discuss the following areas:

    While reading The Awakening, students will be required to read a variety of short stories and essays as a source of reference and/or discussion of the focus theme of fate vs. free-will.  The selections are as follows:

    * Selections taken DiYanni, Robert.  One-Hundred Great  

       Essays.     Penguin Academics; New York, 2002.

    Structured Composition:  Write an essay that analyzes the symbols in The Awakening.  Discuss how specific symbols reflect the character’s position in society or how symbols reveal her search for freedom.

    Final Writing Analysis:  Multi-Genre Essay:  Fate vs. Free-will

    What point does The Awakening make about women and the raising of children in relation to the concept of fate and the obligation to freedom and restraint?  Address the Victorian concept of motherhood and the mother-role of both Edna and Adele.  You are to read and incorportate all three selections;

    Students will be required to read an outside novel that addresses similar issues and themes of the Women’s Literature Unit.  The final project will be an analysis of your selected novel with either Jane Eyre or The Awakening.  The essay topic will be one chosen by use from list of sample AP questions.  Other authors are also available, but check with me first before final approval.

    Outside Novel Authors:  Margaret Atwood, Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Willa Cather, Colette, Anita Desai, George Eliot, Louise Erdich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Joy Kowaga, Margaret Laurence, Katherine Mansfield, Carson McCullers, Flannery O’Connor, Cynthia Ozick, Katherine Anne Porter, Jean Rhys, Edora Welty, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf.

     

    Topic/Unit:  Popular Canon:  Uncontrolled Environment and Human Nature

    Students will be reading a variety of selections that address the issues of human nature in an environment that is unstable.  The concept of civilization vs. imperialism/colonialism will be analyzed and applied to secondary texts as well.  Be prepared to read, write, and discuss these texts and the focused theme on a daily basis.    

     

    Conrad, Joseph.  Heart of Darkness.  Signet; New York, 1997.

    Focused Theme:  Civilization vs. Imperialism/Colonialism

    (approximately 2 weeks)

    Address/Discuss the following areas:

    While reading Heart of Darkness, students will be required to read a variety of short stories and essays as a source of reference and/or discussion of the focus theme of civilization vs. imperialism/colonialism.  The selections are as follows:

    • Selections taken from DiYanni, Robert.  One-Hundred Great Essays.  Penguin Academics; New York, 2002.

      Final Writing Analysis:  AP Writing Prompt Choice

      • Looking at Kurtz, discuss his internal tension, how it affects him in thought and deed, and why the conflict is important in the story?

      • Describe Kurtz’s madness or irrationality, explain its possible sources, and discuss how this behavior is understandable, even reasonable?

      • Explain how Kurtz displays both good and evil and how this duality contributes to the work as a whole?

      • How does Heart of Darkness confront us with scenes of violence, and explain the different ways the scenes help the novel?

        Kingsolver, Barbara.  Poisonwood Bible.  Harper Perennial; New York, 1999.

                    Focused Theme:  Captivity vs. Freedom

        (approximately 4 weeks)

         Address/Discuss the following areas:

        Students will be required to read an outside novel that addresses similar issues and themes of the Popular Canon Unit.  The final project will be a writing analysis of your selected novel.  Students will be given a choice of six writing prompts from previous AP exams.  Other authors are also available, but check with me first before final approval.

        Outside Novel Authors:  John Cheever, Anton Chekhov, Stephen Crane, Charles Dickens, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Theodore Dreiser, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Henry Fielding, F. Scott Fitzgerald, E.M. Forster, Thomas Hardy, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Joseph Heller, Ernest Hemingway, Aldous Huxley, Henrick Ibsen, Henry James, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, D.H. Lawrence, Christopher Marlowe, Herman Melville, George Orwell, George Bernard Shaw, Upton Sinclair, John Steinbeck, Jonathan Swift, Leo Tolstoy, Mark Twain, John Updike, Tennessee Williams.

        Outside Research Project:  The objective is for you to research at least three areas of the world that have been or are currently be colonized.  You are to write a detailed, well-organized, thoughtful essay about the benefits and consequences of colonialism.  Remember to re-familiarize yourself with appropriate citation and works cited page.

          

        Topic/Unit:  Poetry Unit

        Perrine, Laurence.  Sound and Sense.  Harcourt, Brace,

        Jovanovich; San Diego, 1987.

        (approximately 4 weeks)

        Students will be reading and evaluating poetry daily.  You will focus a one or two specific poetic elements and analyze how each poetic term is used to reveal the deeper meaning of a particular poem.  You will also be require to write original works of poetry and submit your pieces to Spectrum, our high school literary magazine.

        Week One:       Discussion of what is poetry and how to read a poem.  Read a variety of poems and identify specific elements of denotation, connotations, and imagery.

        Week Two:      Read a variety of poetry and identify specific elements of figurative language such as metaphor, personification, metonymy, symbol, allegory, paradox, overstatement, understatement, and irony.

        Week Three:    Read a variety of poetry and identify specific elements of allusion, meaning, tone, musical devices, and musical devices.

        Week Four:     Read of variety of poetry and identify specific elements of sound and meaning and pattern.  You will also be assigned three independent poems where you will have to identify all poetic elements of each poem and offer a final analysis of meaning.

        A complete list of poetic elements that will be discussed are as follows:

        Allegory, alliteration, allusion, anaphora, assonance, attitude, ballad, ballad stanza, blank verse, caesura, conceit, connotation, consonance, couplet, dactylic, denotation, elegy, enjambment, epic, extended metaphor, free verse, iambic, imagery, irony, lyric, meaning, metaphor, meter, metonymy, mood, ode, onomatopoeia, paradox, pastoral, pattern, personification, petrarchan sonnet, shaped verse, soliloquy, stanza, style, symbolism, tone, trochee, villanelle, voice.

        Throughout the unit, you will be writing structure response to a number of poetry-guided questions.  You must learn how to organize you essays in a effective way so that your main focus is on meaning as opposed to a simple discussion of poetic elements. You will review AP poetry prompt questions and evaluate the need to organize effectively and focus on the importance of how as opposed the what happens.  Focus and organization should remain on the meaning of the poem as opposed to poetic elements used. 

         

        Semester II Theme:  Tragedy and the Philosophical Nature of the Tragic Hero(ine)


        Topic/Unit:  Multicultural Literature:  The Examination of Self and Other

        Students will be reading a variety of selections that address the philosophical nature of the tragic hero.  The concept of invisibility vs. identity will be analyzed and applied to secondary texts as well.  Be prepared to read, write, and discuss these texts and the focused theme on a daily basis.  Furthermore, the concepts of Philosophy will be introduced, specifically Jean Paul Sartre’s belief of the “self” and “other.”


        Ellison, Ralph.  Invisible Man.  Vintage International; New York, 1952.

        Focused Theme:  The concept of Invisibility and Identity, Self and Other

        (approximately 6-7 weeks)                 

        Address/Discuss the following concepts/areas:

        While reading Invisible Man, students will be required to read a variety of short stories and essays as a source of reference and/or discussion of the focused theme of invisibility vs. identity.  The selections are as follows: 

    • Selections taken from DiYanni, Robert.  One-Hundred Great Essays.  Penguin Academics; New York, 2002.

    Students will be required to read an outside novel that addresses similar issues and themes of the Multicultural Unit.  The final project will be a writing analysis of your selected novel.  Students will be given a choice of six writing prompts from previous AP exams.  Other authors are also available, but check with me first before final approval.

    Outside Novel Authors:  Chinua Achebe, James Baldwin, Saul Bellow, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Zora Neale Hurston, Kazuo Ishiguro, Toni Morrison, Leslie Marmon Silko, Alice Walker.

    Students will also be required to keep a reader response journal answering the following questions:

    Students will be completing two main projects for this unit.

    1.  With a partner, students are to choose a group they consider to be “invisible” in this community.  They will research this particular group and present their findings along with suggestions for improvements to the class.

    2.  Students will present a jazz/Blues project.  They will choose a

         musician/song and identify how Jazz/Blues lyrics reveal   

         poverty, discrimination, protest, and invisibility among a social

         or racial group.  Students will discuss how their song represents

         the African-American struggle for equality and visibility or

         reveals poverty, protest, and invisibility.  They will then reveal

         how Jazz/Blues music reflects Invisible Man’s them, tone,

         characterization.

     

    Topic/Unit:  Drama/Plays:  The Philosophy of Bad Faith

    Students will be reading a variety of selections that address the philosophical nature of the tragic hero.  The concepts of madness and identity will be analyzed and applied to secondary texts as well.  Be prepared to read, write, and discuss these texts and the focused theme on a daily basis.  Furthermore, the concepts of Philosophy will be introduced, specifically Jean Paul Sartre’s belief of “Bad Faith.”

    Shakespeare, William.  Hamlet.  Washington Square Press; New York,

    1992.

    Focused Themes:  Action vs. Inaction, Family Loyalty, Madness

    (approximately 3-4 weeks)

    Address/Discuss the following areas:

    Students will be required to identify and write into modern English all seven soliloquies.  They will then discuss the importance of soliloquy in a particular scene.

    Final Writing Analysis:  Students will consider character behavior and

    action.  Taken from a sample AP Test question, students will write an

    essay that compares Hamlet’s madness to that of Ophelia’s.  Students will

    comment on how the two characters enrich each other.  Furthermore,

    students will comment upon the response of sane, moral individuals

    caught in a moral dilemma.

    Miller, Arthur.  Death of a Salesman.  Penguin Books; New York, 1977.

    Focused Theme:  Bad Faith and Authentic Self

    (approximately 3 weeks)

    Address/Discuss the Following Areas:

    • Bad Faith and authentic self

    • family expectations and loyalty

    • Literary Terms:

    While reading Death of a Salesman, students will be required to read a variety of short stories and essays as a source of reference and/or discussion of the focused theme of bad faith and the authentic self.  The selections are as follows:

    * Selections taken from DiYanni, Robert.  One-Hundred

    Great Essays.  Penguin Academics; New York, 2002.

    Class participation is crucial in your success in AP English.  Daily reading assignments and group discussions accompanied by written essays will be required.

    This syllabus is designed as a helpful outline of the year’s activities.  However, some items may be added or deleted as needed.

    Daily/Weekly Activities/Assignments

    • Note taking is essential.  Be prepared to take notes from lecture as well as during reading assignments. 

    • You will be writing daily in class.  Timed reader response objective questions and essays will be given 2-3 times weekly.

    • Appropriate videos reflecting the novel will be used.

    Research

    Students will be required to complete a number of research projects including those via the library and the computer.  You will be required to cite all your sources carefully and correctly.  All research/citation must follow the MLA format.

    Speaking

    You will be participating/presenting a number of individual and group presentations.

    • English Language Project

    • Poetry reading

    • Invisibility Project

    • Jazz/Blues Project

    AP Test Preparation

    Test preparation is a year-long process.  Sample objective tests will be given throughout the year.  In-class writing prompts will be used from the very beginning of the school year in correlation with novel analysis.

    • Five full-length multiple choice practice tests.

    • Two poetry papers taken from sample AP  tests, one to be written at home and

    one in class.

    • Two prose papers taken from sample AP test questions, one to be written at home

    and one in class.

    • Four open-ended novel papers taken from sample AP Test questions to be

    completed in class and turned in.

    • Two open-ended novel papers taken from sample AP Test questions to be written

    at home and turned in.

    Grading Scale

    The grading scale is as follows:

                92-100%          A

                90-91%            A-

                88-89%            B+

                82-87%            B

                80-81%            B-

                78-79%            C+

                72-77%            C

                70-71%            C-

                68-69%            D+

                62-67%            D

                60-61%            D-

                0-59%              E

    Cardmarking

    Each cardmarking is based on points earned divided by points possible.  Each marking period is worth 40% or your overall grade. 

    Semester/Final Exam

    The semester grade is based upon the following forma:

    • Marking period 1:       40%

    • Marking period 2        40%

    • Final Exam:               20%

    The final exam is a cumulative analysis of the semester’s syllabus.  Biographical information, notes, literary facts, novel quotations will be asked.    Literary analysis will also be required for any of the selected novels.

    Bibliography

    Bronte, Charlotte.  Jane Eyre.  Signet Classics; New York, 1982.

    Chopin, Kate.  The Awakening.  Barbara Solomon, ed.  Signet; New York,

    1976.

    Conrad, Joseph.  Heart of Darkness.  Signet; New York, 1997.

    DiYanni, Robert.  One-Hundreed Great Essays.  Penguin Academics;

    New York, 2002.

    Ellison, Ralph.  Invisible Man.  Vintage International; New York, 1952.

    Kingsolver, Barbara.  Poisonwood Bible.  Harper Perennial; New York, 1999.

    Miller, Arthur.  Death of a Salesman.  Penguin Books; New York, 1977.

    Perrine, Laurence.  Sound and Sense.  Harcourt, Brace,

    Jovanovich; San Diego, 1987.

    Shakespeare, William.  Hamlet.  Washington Square Press; New York,

    1992.

    Wilder, Thornton.  Our Town